Can I Live Normal Life With MS?

How does MS affect daily life?

Sometimes people with MS have problems with memory, concentration, problem-solving, and/or other cognitive functions.

These symptoms are usually caused directly by the disease’s damage to myelin and the nerve cells.

However, cognitive symptoms can also be indirectly affected by depression, anxiety, stress, or fatigue..

Can you live with MS and not know it?

With the options available today, people around you whom you know and love may have MS—and you might not even know it. “When we talk to patients and families about the clinical course of MS, they are amazed to find out that patients run marathons, have children, live completely normal lives,” said Smith.

What does MS feel like at first?

Numbness or Tingling A lack of feeling or a pins-and-needles sensation can be the first sign of the nerve damage from MS. It usually happens in the face, arms, or legs, and on one side of the body. It also tends to go away on its own.

Can you work with multiple sclerosis?

You can work with MS. Many people who have it stay in their job for years after they’re diagnosed. It varies greatly from person to person. In time, you may need to ask for accommodations so you can continue there.

Can MS go away?

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic condition, which means it’s long-lasting and there’s no cure for it. That said, it’s important to know that for the vast majority of people who have MS, the disease is not fatal. Most of the 2 million people worldwide with MS have a standard life expectancy.

What is a MS attack like?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks can include tingling, numbness, fatigue, cramps, tightness, dizziness, and more. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which your own antibodies (autoantibodies) start attacking and destroying the nerve cells of your body.

How do most MS patients die?

Some of the most common causes of death in MS patients are secondary complications resulting from immobility, chronic urinary tract infections, compromised swallowing and breathing. Some of the complications in this category are chronic bed sores, urogenital sepsis, and aspiration or bacterial pneumonia.

Does MS get worse with age?

This is because as you get older, your MS symptoms are likely to change. MS damages myelin, the protective coating around nerves. This damage interrupts the flow of nerve impulses from the brain to the body. The greater the damage that’s done to the myelin, the more severe your symptoms will become.

What are the four stages of MS?

Four disease courses have been identified in multiple sclerosis: clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), and secondary progressive MS (SPMS).

Is MS a terminal illness?

So is MS a terminal illness? No, it isn’t classed as a terminal illness. It is a life long condition because there is no cure so far. It is a condition where treatments exist but where much better treatments are needed.

Does MS shorten your life?

MS itself is rarely fatal, but complications may arise from severe MS, such as chest or bladder infections, or swallowing difficulties. The average life expectancy for people with MS is around 5 to 10 years lower than average, and this gap appears to be getting smaller all the time.

How bad is having MS?

On average, most people with MS live about seven years less than the general population. Those with MS tend to die from many of the same conditions, such as cancer and heart disease, as people who don’t have the condition. Apart from cases of severe MS, which are rare, the prognosis for longevity is generally good.

What is end stage MS?

If an individual reaches this stage, where their disabilities result in severe difficulties which may not respond to treatment and lead to life-threatening complications, they are considered to have end stage MS.

What happens with untreated MS?

Relapsing-remitting MS can progress into a more aggressive form of the disease. The NMSS reports that, if left untreated, half of those with the relapsing-remitting form of the condition develop secondary-progressive MS within a decade of the first diagnosis.

How quickly can MS progress?

Following an initial period of time with RRMS, the disease becomes more steadily progressive, with or without occasional relapses. Frequency: If left untreated, 50% of people with relapsing-remitting MS develop this form of the disease within about 10 years of initial diagnosis.

How long does it take for MS to disable you?

Most patients and physicians harbor an unfounded view of MS as a relentlessly progressive, inevitably disabling disease. The truth is that 15 years after the onset of MS, only about 20% of patients are bedridden or institutionalized.

Is MS considered a disability?

Multiple Sclerosis is listed as a potentially disabling neurological condition by the Social Security Administration. … To be considered for Social Security disability benefits for MS, you should make sure your condition matches the standards put forth by the SSA in their Blue Book.

How did I get multiple sclerosis?

The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown. It’s considered an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks its own tissues. In the case of MS , this immune system malfunction destroys the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord (myelin).