Should I Get Off My Antidepressant?

Do you lose weight after coming off antidepressants?

Some suggest that water retention may be responsible for the increased weight, but once the medication is out of the body, the excess water should be lost.

Others point to some muscle loss before and during the early stages of treatment, when depression had led to weeks of inactivity..

Can you ever get off antidepressants?

Some people with depression stay on their medication indefinitely. Others are able to stop taking it after a period of weeks or months. The best way to stop taking your antidepressant is to slowly taper the medication under a doctor’s supervision.

Is it normal to have bad days on antidepressants?

What if I continue having good and bad days? You may be having a partial response to the drug. If you have residual symptoms, your depression is more likely to return. Many people feel so much better with medication that they dismiss such symptoms as just having a “little” trouble sleeping or a “slight” energy problem.

What are the long term effects of antidepressants?

During long-term SSRI therapy, the most troubling adverse effects are sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance.

Which antidepressants have the worst withdrawal symptoms?

Among the SSRIs paroxetine seems to be the worst offender and fluoxetine the least while sertraline and fluvoxamine tend to be intermediate. However, the most serious discontinuation reactions came from the SNRI venlafaxine.

Do you feel better after stopping antidepressants?

The best reason to stop taking your antidepressant is because you feel better and you and your doctor believe that you will stay well after you stop taking it. An antidepressant needs time to work. You may need to take it for 1 to 3 weeks before you start to feel better and for 6 to 8 weeks before you feel much better.

What is the hardest antidepressant to come off of?

Hardest-to-Stop Antidepressantscitalopram) (Celexa)escitalopram (Lexapro)paroxetine (Paxil)sertraline (Zoloft)

Is it OK to stop antidepressants cold turkey?

Suddenly quitting antidepressants can cause uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms like dizziness and tremors. Gradually reducing doses under medical supervision can ease potential discomfort.

Does your brain go back to normal after antidepressants?

The process of healing the brain takes quite a bit longer than recovery from the acute symptoms. In fact, our best estimates are that it takes 6 to 9 months after you are no longer symptomatically depressed for your brain to entirely recover cognitive function and resilience.

What is the #1 antidepressant?

Zoloft and Lexapro came in first for a combination of effectiveness and fewer side effects, followed by Prozac (fluoxetine), Paxil (paroxetine), Cymbalta, and Luvox among others. “We were surprised because we found a difference among antidepressants,” said Dr.

Do I have to be on antidepressants for the rest of my life?

Although it may be tempting to stop medication as your mood lifts, continue taking it for as long as your doctor recommends. Most doctors advise patients to take antidepressants for six months to a year after they no longer feel depressed. Stopping before that time can cause depression to return.

What does SSRI withdrawal feel like?

The most common symptoms of SSRI discontinuation syndrome are described as either being flu-like, or feeling like a sudden return of anxiety or depression. 1 They include: Dizziness. Vertigo.

What is a brain zap?

Brain zaps are electrical shock sensations in the brain. They can happen in a person who is decreasing or stopping their use of certain medications, particularly antidepressants. Brain zaps are not harmful and will not damage the brain. However, they can be bothersome, disorienting, and disruptive to sleep.

Do SSRIs permanently change your brain?

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) such as Prozac are regularly used to treat severe anxiety and depression. They work by immediately increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain and by causing long term changes in brain function.